A Day in the Life of a Wahine Kia’i Kuli: A Deaf Woman Protector

The Deaf residents in the state are forgotten people in Hawaii so they want to be a part of Mauna Kea Protectors. On July 27 2019, they had their personal reasons that compelled them to go. It’s about protecting the land ( Aina) , culture ( ka moʻomeheu ), people ( ka poʻe ) and Mauna.

Yvette Ibarra-Keohuloa is a deaf woman from Oahu and would like to share with you her experience. Here is her story. All comments and opinions are those of Yvette Ibarra-Keohuloa.

On the day of Saturday July 27 2019, the day welcomed us Nā kiaʻi kuli with Mauna’s grace. Na kia’i Kuli shown to be a “VOICE” for the voiceless people and we stand for this cause for both current and future generations of Deaf Hawaiians and Polynesians. And to preserve the ALOHA spirit and culture of their Sacred Aina.


 It was such a cultural awakening for many in the Deaf community of Hawaii and they had their personal reasons that compelled them to go. And to understand the purpose of protecting what is sacred. No to the Thirty Meter Telescope. It’s about protecting the land ( Aina) , culture ( ka moʻomeheu ), people ( ka poʻe ) and Mauna. So, Na kia’i Kuli shown continuous support and experienced the level of ALOHA that’s not found anywhere else but at Pu’u Huluhulu. I as for one, am fighting with the greatest weapon: Aloha.

 Mauna Kea We Stand ✊🏼 Yvette Ibarra-Keohuloa

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